Thursday, March 20, 2014

Invisible People - A Post From The Road

St. Mary's Mission School on Red Lake Reservation, MN
Invisible This project will look into why one in two Native American women will be the victims of domestic violence as well as the role historical events, and United States policy towards the indigenous populations have played in bringing about this epidemic. I will discuss U.S. government policies past and present, and how a systematic approach meant to extinguish Native American culture has led to the highest rates of depression, substance abuse, and sexual violence of any ethnic group in the United States. I will focus on the historical trauma from three major events: Forced Relocation, the Dawe’s Act and the Boarding School Era, and discuss the effects they have had on today’s indigenous populations and their implications on the prevalence of violence against women in Native communities. 

On my most recent trip for the documentary project Invisible People I spent nine days on the road in Minnesota, six of those days with Andrew McMullen, Director of Photography, collecting testimonials interviews and filming. 

Tina, Executive Director of MSH trying to get me to understand
Tina, Executive Director of MSH explaining to me why  American Indians
refer to themselves was Invisible
I have been blessed with the opportunity to talk  with some very profound and inspiring people. They have invited me into their lives and shared their personal stories with me. Although all the women I am speaking with possess an incredible strength and courageousness, I can see momentary breaks in their stoicism, and my insides turn with guilt as their emotions break to the surface in subtle ways.

I know that by doing this work I am rattling old memories, and I wonder what right do I have? I do so in the hope of telling a story that needs telling, of honoring their survival and fight and sharing with the rest of us the epidemic that indigenous women are facing all over the country. It is time for the men to join the battle and for people outside of the Native communities to "own" this country's past and the pain and suffering it has caused.

"For anyone who has gone through childhood sexual abuse...
you know victory and success by surviving the night" -Nikki

I am humbled by these women, and all the people working at Mending the Sacred Hoop (MSH) and American Indian Housing Organization (AICHO). They, and the other ones out there fighting to survive and to change their reality are the true warriors of their communities.







"It's family first for a lot of Natives, that's were your sense of identity comes from, your immediate family."
- Officer Northrup, Fond du Lac Reservation

After a long, emotional day of revisiting her childhood home and the good and traumatic memories of her past, we exhale at Lower Red Lake, MN
Sarah from MSH speaks with survivors and friends at a dinner gathering
Patti from AICHO talks and jokes with fellow survivors and friends at a dinner gathering
Smokes stacks from a power plant silhouetted at sunset, on the road back to Duluth from Bemidjii, MN
Smokes stacks from a power plant silhouetted at sunset, Highway 2, MN


DP Andrew McMullen setting up a shot
DP Andrew McMullen setting up a shot

Since February 2013 I have been working to discusses domestic violence from a Native American perspective. I am blessed to have met some incredibly awesome, courageous and inspiring people that are making this possible. I am honored to have been given a window into their lives, hardships and victories. I look forward to the journey ahead...













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Friday, February 14, 2014

Taking a Visual Break from the Snow

With all of us posting so many images of snowstorms, snowpocalyps' and snow days, I wanted to take a break from all the white and post a little blue from around the corner in my neighborhood. Have a Pleasant Stay...




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Monday, February 3, 2014

Snow Day Pictures, New York City Waterfront

I woke up early this morning to find the city dusted in beautiful white, silent and soft. With big, soft and pillowy snowflakes floating down to earth I decided to walk down to the waterfront to snap some pics 

A tugboat passes between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridge, Dumbo, New York
A tugboat passes between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridge, Dumbo, New York

The Dumbo Carousel in it's glass case is a beautiful place to view the snowstorm from, Dumbo, New York
The Dumbo Carousel in it's glass case is a beautiful place to view the snowstorm from, Dumbo, New York

He has a long way to go, clearing the pier today of the accumulated snow will take a while, Dumbo, New York
He has a long way to go, clearing the pier today of the accumulated snow will take a while, Dumbo, New York

The Carousel in Dumbo protected from the snowstorm by a glass case, must be a beautiful time for a ride. Dumbo New York


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Monday, December 16, 2013

Huffington Post Publishes my Article on Education

Challenging Conventional Ideas of Education 
by Marlon Krieger

A boy looks out of the school window in Bolognese, Peru
"...We arrived by permission of the village Chief to discuss the school they had built for their community and to meet with some of their teachers. Our local guide for the day had gone to college in a nearby town of Atalaya, 10 hours away by canoe. He had come back to his village to change the education being delivered there. He explained to us that he wanted to bring education to his people, but not to teach them our [Western] ways; he'd seen how we lived and didn't like it. He wanted to use education to improve their lives, not change their way of life. They live simply and want to continue living their way, education would give them strength, he said."
To read the whole article please visit Huffington Post/Marlon_Krieger



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Monday, November 25, 2013

The Real Story Behind Thanksgiving

(Don't let the length of this intimidate you, its a quick read)


As I do every year around this time since I started blogging I'd like to share a bit of history with you:

Nett Lake Reservation, Minnesotta by Marlon Krieger

Our nation often criticizes others for their failure to teach history accurately, admonishing countries that omit key historic events in their children's text books or fail to acknowledge atrocities commit upon other cultures or people. Turkey, Russia, Japan among others have been on the receiving end. Yet I never really learned the extent of the devastation laid upon the Native American population that lived in this country. I didn't learn it in elementary school, not in high school, and I didn't learn it in college, it's touched on, but usually glossed over. This is a part of our countries' history and a nation's shame should not hinder us from teaching it and learning from it.

The story began in 1614 when a band of English explorers sailed home to England with a ship full of Patuxet Indians bound for slavery. They left behind smallpox which virtually wiped out those who had escaped. By the time the Pilgrims arrived in Massachusetts Bay they found only one living Patuxet Indian, a man named Squanto who had survived slavery in England and knew their language. He taught them to grow corn and to fish, and negotiated a peace treaty between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Nation. At the end of their first year, the Pilgrims held a great feast honoring Squanto and the Wampanoags.

But as word spread in England about the paradise to be found in the new world, religious zealots called Puritans began arriving by the boat load. Finding no fences around the land, they considered it to be in the public domain. Joined by other British settlers, they seized land, capturing strong young Natives for slaves and killing the rest. But the Pequot Nation had not agreed to the peace treaty Squanto had negotiated and they fought back. The Pequot War was one of the bloodiest Indian wars ever fought.

In 1637 near present day Groton, Connecticut, over 700 men, women and children of the Pequot Tribe had gathered for their annual Green Corn Festival which is our Thanksgiving celebration. In the predawn hours the sleeping Indians were surrounded by English and Dutch mercenaries who ordered them to come outside. Those who came out were shot or clubbed to death while the terrified women and children who huddled inside the longhouse were burned alive. The next day the governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony declared "A Day Of Thanksgiving" because 700 unarmed men, women and children had been murdered.

Cheered by their "victory", the brave colonists and their Indian allies attacked village after village. Women and children over 14 were sold into slavery while the rest were murdered. Boats loaded with a many as 500 slaves regularly left the ports of New England. Bounties were paid for Indian scalps to encourage as many deaths as possible.

Following an especially successful raid against the Pequot in what is now Stamford, Connecticut, the churches announced a second day of "thanksgiving" to celebrate victory over the heathen savages. During the feasting, the hacked off heads of Natives were kicked through the streets like soccer balls. Even the friendly Wampanoag did not escape the madness. Their chief was beheaded, and his head impaled on a pole in Plymouth, Massachusetts -- where it remained on display for 24 years.

The killings became more and more frenzied, with days of thanksgiving feasts being held after each successful massacre. George Washington finally suggested that only one day of Thanksgiving per year be set aside instead of celebrating each and every massacre. Later Abraham Lincoln decreed Thanksgiving Day to be a legal national holiday during the Civil War -- on the same day he ordered troops to march against the starving Sioux in Minnesota.

This story doesn't have quite the same fuzzy feelings associated with it as the one where the Indians and Pilgrims are all sitting down together at the big feast. But we need to learn our true history so it won't ever be repeated. Next Thanksgiving, when you gather with your loved ones to Thank God for all your blessings, think about those people who only wanted to live their lives and raise their families. They, also took time out to say "thank you" to Creator for all their blessings.
by Susan Bates


Today the town of Plymouth Rock has a Thanksgiving ceremony each year in remembrance of the first Thanksgiving. There are still Wampanoag people living in Massachusetts. In 1970, they asked one of them to speak at the ceremony to mark the 350th anniversary of the Pilgrim's arrival. Here is part of what was said:

"Today is a time of celebrating for you -- a time of looking back to the first days of white people in America. But it is not a time of celebrating for me. It is with a heavy heart that I look back upon what happened to my People. When the Pilgrims arrived, we, the Wampanoags, welcomed them with open arms, little knowing that it was the beginning of the end. That before 50 years were to pass, the Wampanoag would no longer be a tribe. That we and other Indians living near the settlers would be killed by their guns or dead from diseases that we caught from them. Let us always remember, the Indian is and was just as human as the white people."

Spend time with your family and friends this week, help out the hungry or the homeless,  give thanks for what you have and remember the truth of our nation's history, it isn't a celebration for all.



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Thursday, October 10, 2013

Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

I came across this a bit late, but definitely still worth sharing.

She who tells a story: women photographers from Iran and the Arab world
photo from MFAB

An exhibition currently up at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston called "She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World" features the work of twelve pioneering photographers:
Jananne Al-Ani
Boushra Almutawakel
Gohar Dashti
Rana El Nemr
Lalla Essaydi
Shadi Ghadirian
Tanya Habjouqa
Rula Halawani
Nermine Hammam
Rania Matar
Shirin Neshat
Newsha Tavakolian

Photography can play an important role in developing social change and bringing awareness and it can be used as a tool for empowerment. Who better to reflect on social issues, traditions and identity than women photographers in countries where their roles in society are at a splintering and where traditions and empowerment often collide.



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Friday, September 13, 2013

EXP Adventure- Mt. Washington

I had the good fortune to be able to work with Milo, Tom and the EXP Adventure team. This was my first opportunity to apply my work to another passion of mine, the outdoors. EXP Adventures is a travel company that specializes in bringing people to epic locations around the world in style and comfort to engage in a variety of physical activities and monumental experiences. They asked me to shoot a video for them of one of their expedition to Mt. Washington.

Armed with little more than my Canon 5D I set out to document this adventure, and it was a wonderful experience. I learned a lot and am thankful to have gotten the opportunity to photograph and film while hiking and camping.

Thank you Milo and Tom for this opportunity, and a special thanks to Beau DeCourcy our guide and the EXP Mt. Washington specialist and to Caleb for helping me carrying my gear up and down and up and down that mountain.







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Life- "If you're not living on the edge, you're not doing it right"


At the end of July I spent nine days camping and rock climbing at the Cirque of the Towers in the Wind River Range of Wyoming with a friend. It was an incredibly arduous trip filled with epic stories and monumental surroundings. 

The more I climb and the deeper I dive into this world the more I am amazed at how much of the lessons I learn and the experiences I have on the mountain relate directly to my everyday life and my work. Out there, high up on a vertical wall, exposed to the elements, where you rely on instincts, adrenaline and mental focus you are reduced to the most basic of physical and mental processes. Everything unnecessary just melts away and you attain complete nowness. Aside from being an incredible sensation, witnessing your own mental process in this striped down state is incredibly enlightening, like taking away all the bells and whistles to see how the cogs really turn.

It is also a powerful way to master your mind


The Cirque of the Towers in the Wind River Range of Wyoming. Looking towards Pingora
Looking at Pingora and Lonesome Lake

The Cirque of the Towers in the Wind River Range of Wyoming. Admiring the peaks at sunset
Nathan examining our route on Pingora

Warbonnet and Warrior to the right

The Cirque of the Towers in the Wind River Range of Wyoming. Looking towards Wolf's head on the approach
Can you see him? Approaching Cirque Lake

The Cirque of the Towers in the Wind River Range of Wyoming. Looking towards Warbonnet and Warrior
Warbonnet and Warrior from the Cirque Lake approach

The Cirque of the Towers in the Wind River Range of Wyoming. Looking down from belay station 8 on Wolf's head, Lonesome lake
Pitch 8 of Wolf's Head looking out onto Lonesome Lake

The Cirque of the Towers in the Wind River Range of Wyoming. Cirque Lake
Cirque Lake

The Cirque of the Towers in the Wind River Range of Wyoming at sunset
Cirque of the Towers, The WInd River Range Wyoming


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Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Operation Massacre - (Rodolfo Walsh) translated after 56 years

For those of you who still read books, and like long form journalism here is a good one.

Tuesday September 17th @ 7pm
52 Prince Street, New York



Daniella Gitlin, Michael Greenberg and Ernesto Semán will introduce the book and present a bilingual conversation and discussion. They are accomplished writer's in their own right and I expect this to be  a wonderful evening. See you there!


This captivating and clear-eyed book, a true crime narrative first published in Spanish in 1957 and fluently translated here by Gitlin, is Argentinian political journalist Walsh's account of the execution, on June 9, 1956, of five men suspected of participating in a failed coup against the military government designed to return Péron to power. Walsh opens with his experience that night, when he came home to find government forces using his house as a point of defense against Péron supporters. In December 1956, a rumor that one of the men believed to be executed might be alive inspires Walsh's year-long investigation, which turns up survivors of the secret executions, the circumstances that led to the illegal executions, and the failures of the justice system. Walsh provides a moment-by-moment account and reveals as much as he can about the survivors and those who were executed. The reason for such precision becomes clear as events unfold. In addition to the introduction by Michael Greenberg and afterword by Ricardo Piglia, the book's helpful appendices include prologues and epilogues from previous editions, as well as the Open Letter from a Writer to the Military Junta, which Walsh delivered to local and foreign press correspondents on March 24, 1977, a day before he was kidnapped, never to be seen again. -Publishers weekly 
 


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Monday, June 3, 2013

Selling prints of Winter to help fund my Latest Project in Duluth, Minnesota

see below for purchase options

Last time I was in Duluth, MN I naively stepped off the plane mid-March in jeans, t-shirt and sneakers only to find 3-5 feet of snow on the ground and freezing temperatures. Man was I out of my element. Cold and red nosed I went about my work researching a project on education and domestic abuse from a Native American perspective. What I found was beauty, devotion and culture as well as hardships, injustice and pain.

Native Americans have been on this land for thousands of years, they've endured brutal conquest and continuos subjugation through government policy and racists stereotypes still in place today. I'm spending time with an invisible people that have mesmerized our imaginations for so many years through Hollywood and art-work but have never fully become a part of this nation-state. We failed to understand their history and place in a contemporary world nor have we given weight to their cultural norms, religious beliefs or social institution within our own. These elements are not at odds with a contemporary American society, but an important part of it and of every single person living on American soil.

I was lucky enough to meet some wonderful people who opened their hearts to me and taught me about the nuances of Domestic Abuse and policies relating to them, dispelled many misconceptions and began to show me Anishinaabe culture and traditions.

In the last email I exchanged with one of the women, she told me that "Ziigwan (spring) has finally told Biiboon (winter) to stop flirting with her, and it looks like we may have an actual spring!"

I loved the line so much that I wanted to share with you pictures of Biiboon. I found the views so peaceful and quiet, the white of the sky touching the white of the earth creates an infinity that opens your imagination and sets you off dreaming.


Snow covered Nett Lake in Duluth, MN photograph by Marlon Krieger
Nett Lake at the Bois Forte Reservation photo by Marlon Krieger
snow covered Lake Superior in Duluth, Minnesota photography by Marlon Krieger
Lake Superior photo by Marlon Krieger
snow covered Lake Superior in Duluth, Minnesota photography by Marlon Krieger
Lake Superior photo by Marlon Krieger
snow covered Nett Lake Duluth, Minnesota photography by Marlon Krieger
Nett Lake at the Bois Forte Reservation photo by Marlon Krieger

An snow covered factory near Cook, Minnesotta photograph by Marlon Krieger
Factory near Cook, MN photograph by Marlon Krieger
Pabst and Coke on Highway 53 Photograph by Marlon Krieger
Tow-truck on Riverstreet photograph by Marlon Krieger

In an effort to raise money for my work on education and domestic abuse from a Native American perspective I am selling fine art prints of a select few photographs in high editions. This allows me to offer prints at the special price of $50, $95 and $195. 

With the sale of any item you will receive notifications regarding the project and be the first to see the completed version.

Think of this as a great gift for a friend, loved one or a present for yourself while supporting a creative project and good cause. These are high quality art prints, signed and editioned.

Allow up to 45 days for your print to arrive, I will do my best to get it to you sooner

Postcards 
Set of 20                                                                    $65
16pt card stock                                       

Fine Art Prints

11x14 digital C print                                                    $109 + $6 shipping
signed, matted and in edition of 125

16x20 digital C print                                                    $203+ $12 shipping
signed, matted and in edition of  99

If you would like one of the images in a lower edition please inquire about available sizes and prices privately via email.

And please share this post on Facebook and Twitter, even if you are not buying, maybe someone you know will take an interest.



Feel free to contact me with any questions blog@marlonkrieger.com


Thank you,
Marlon Krieger

Sizes
Print



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Sunday, May 12, 2013

Honor Mother's day through celebrating the sacredness of women

Today we celebrate more than just Mother's Day. We celebrate the gift of life that women represent. We celebrate what only a women can do, the responsibility she bears and the incredible powers that come with it. 

Photo by Marlon Krieger in the rural region outside of Cuzco Peru
photo by Marlon Krieger



In the beginning it was understood that women were sacred, they were the healers, bringers of life and the sustainers of their communities. Their council was sought in many important affairs out of respect for their vision and creativity. They were seen as having a direct connection to the mother of all things, because they too give life. In traditional communities they were protected from abuse and assault and cherished for the role they played. Then their place in society was diminished as men began to see women's roles as a source of power and control.  The idea of a medicine "man" and seers as male positions came later after the traditional roles of women had been hijacked for the sake of greed. And so women began to fall from grace in societies around the world and throughout time.

Today women battle injustices and grave dangerous to their health; mental and physical, because societies, cultures and perverted interpretations of religion fail to protect them and afford them the rights they deserve. The list of dangers and injustices is long: sex trafficking, arranged marriages, child birth, assault, domestic abuse, maternal mortality, rights to education, rights to make decisions, 'honor based violence', infanticide, etc.  Why have 1 in 5 women in the Untied States experienced sexual violence, why is it that every minute a woman dies unnecessarily from complications in child birth, why are they still sold for their bodies, or attacked for making decisions regarding marriage.

"It appears that more girls have been killed in the last fifty years, precisely because they were girls, than men were killed in all the battles of the twentieth century. More girls are killed in this routine “gendercide” in any one-decade than people were slaughtered in all the genocides of the twentieth century.   - Half the Sky by Sheryl WuDunn and Nicholas Kristoff Page: xvii; Introduction

So as you celebrate Mother's Day today don't just buy her a gifts or dutifully go to a family brunch in the name of a gimmicky holiday. Remember the challenges that women and mother's around the world are facing this day and let your mother know that she is sacred and beautiful because of her strengths, her will and because she is a women. 

My mother is the strongest person I know, she is my guardian angel and my healer. Nothing can replace the hug of a mother and the energy that it exchanges and you shouldn't need mother's day to remind you to tell her.

The three madonnas by Marlon Krieger and Annalisa Iadicicco, pboto of Ashanika women in Peru
photo by Annalisa Iadicicco and Marlon Krieger
Women are sacred, they are mothers, leaders and thinkers full of creativity and power. They are half of everything in life including men. Without a women's half free and empowered, we are just half of what we as men, families and communities are supposed to be.

I can imagine no better way to thank you mother today than to pay tribute to women and help change the way women are treated within society. Their are countless organizations doing good work around the world. Choose one and volunteer, make a donation or just show your suppport in your mother's name. Below is a short list you can use as a starting point.


“It's no accident that the countries that have enjoyed an economic take off have been those that educated girls ...”
― Sheryl WuDunn, Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide

If you have any other movements or organizations in mind please add them to the list:

http://www.halftheskymovement.org/pages/act
http://www.girleffect.org
http://www.antislavery.org/english/what_you_can_do/default.aspx
http://www.care.org
http://www.equalitynow.org/actions
http://www.safercampus.org
http://www.campaignforeducation.org/en/

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Monday, May 6, 2013

Lenticular Photo Used To Secretly Convey Hot Line Number To Abused Kids

In an attempt to protect kids from being seen looking at the hotline number and being exposed to violence or preventative measures by their aggressors the ANAR foundation created Lenticular street signs, meaning that a different message is seen from different angles.

To people at the average height of a 10 year old and below the poster displays a secret messages and phone number saying:
"If somebody hurts you, phone us and we'll help you"





While adults see:
"Sometimes child abuse is only visible to the child suffering it"



This is a very simple, inventive and catchy approach. I hope it gets as much attention from the children who need help as it's getting in the creative community. 

A short video explaining the process:

 

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Friday, May 3, 2013

Borderland: North Korean Refugees by Katharina Hesse

Katharina Hesse's work Borderland: North Korean Refugees is on display for Moving Walls at Open Society Foundation May 8th-December 13th 2013.

© Katharina Hesse
©Katharina Hesse
I've always loved Katharina's work, she manages to say a lot with very little. That is; simple, singular and very human pictures, like whispers of important information you want to lean in so you don't miss a syllable. I never feel like a voyeur looking at her photographs, but a part of the moment, which I find rare and important today where photographers have become more and more intrusive in an attempt to get the "hard" shot that will move people. In reality they are taking the easy way in, not relying on their intellect and creativity to tell the story, but on their ability to just be there. Katharina's work is more thought provoking, more timeless and more personal. If you get a chance I recommend checking out the show, I'll be there.




©Katharina Hesse

©Katharina Hesse

Kim Jeong-Ya (a pseudonym), 67, who lives near the North Korean border in Yanji, China, belongs to a handful of Chinese activists who have dedicated their lives to helping North Koreans make a safe passage from North Korea to South Korea via mainland China. Most foreign activists are simply expelled from China if caught participating in assistance missions, whereas, local Chinese and some South Koreans have faced severe punishment. Kim has been imprisoned twice and beaten up by North Korean agents operating in China. Kim’s relatives, who did the same kind of support work “disappeared” in North Korea. Since her release from jail, Kim has been under intense police surveillance. Her meager life savings was confiscated by local authorities, and she is not allowed to leave her home in the suburbs of Yanji. 
                                        

©Katharina Hesse

© Katharina Hesse

©Katharina Hesse
© Katharina Hesse
Artist Statement
I began photographing North Korean refugees on the Chinese border about nine years ago, when an editor at a U.S. magazine contacted me for a photo assignment but was reluctant to give any details over the phone. Upon arriving in Northern China, I felt like I had entered a different world. As I accompanied a reporter in the barren border region, I listened to horrific tales of survival and violence: hungry people eating roots and grass or being shot for stealing food; civilians fleeing soldiers and living in a constant state of fear.
As we traveled along the border, I heard similar stories repeatedly: people dying of hunger; authorities violently punishing people for stealing food; teenage North Korean defectors missing their families; men in tears, overwhelmed with guilt about those they had left behind. At one interview, a young boy asked what the white liquid was when he saw his first glass of milk.

North Korea’s repressive regime uses selective food allocation as a tool to maintain loyalty among those deemed politically and economically useful. Meanwhile, state-run media produces propaganda designed to convince North Koreans that they are better off than people elsewhere.

After experiencing a world like this, it just didn’t feel “right” to take pictures and move on to the next job. The fear among these people was overwhelming. It was only on the condition that their identities were protected that I could photograph them. Locations could not be recognizable and names could not be used in text. To my surprise, North Koreans in Seoul made similar demands even though they had fled the North years ago.
Recent increases in access to foreign media and trade with businesspeople from neighboring countries like China have given many North Koreans more information about the outside world and the poor conditions in their own country.

Although North Koreans could be eligible for official UN refugee status, China prefers to categorize North Koreans as economic migrants. Therefore, most North Korean refugees on the border live in limbo without any protection from either China or international organizations like the UNHCR.

Borderland provides a more intimate and personal narrative to existing media coverage of North Korea as the world’s “most reclusive” communist country. As media attention fluctuates, North Korea’s refugees remain an enduring presence whose stories need to be told.
—Katharina Hesse, April 2013

224 West 57th Street
New York, New York 10019
212-548-0600


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Thursday, May 2, 2013

Slanted Magazine Issue #21 "Cuba-The New Generation"

I had the great pleasure to be interviewed by Julia Kahl of Slanted Magazine in connection with their 21st issue Cuba-The New Generation which illustrated contemporary design, photography, illustration and typography from Cuba with a special focus on Cuban poster art.
A praying Angel in a cemetery in Cuba photo by Marlon Krieger
© Marlon Krieger

Check out the interview and see some of the pictures here: http://www.slanted.de/eintrag/island-stream-story-cuba (at the top you can hit the translate button for any part that is in German)


The issue is produced and executed stunningly and gives long overdue exposure to some incredible work. I highly recommend taking a moment to check out the links and consider buying a copy, a direct link below for that.

Thanks in part to a successful crowd-funding campaign this will be the first completely bilingual issue (Spanish/English) for Slanted.

Slanted #21 Cuban- The New Generation interview with Marlon Krieger

Slanted #21 Cuban- The New Generation interview with Marlon Krieger

Slanted #21 Cuban- The New Generation interview with Marlon Krieger

Slanted #21 Cuban- The New Generation interview with Marlon Krieger

Slanted #21 Cuban- The New Generation interview with Marlon Krieger

Slanted #21 Cuban- The New Generation interview with Marlon Krieger

Slanted #21 Cuban- The New Generation interview with Marlon Krieger


You can acquire a copy here: http://www.slanted.de/magazine/current
In addition you will receive the booklet “Contemporary Typefaces” presents the most interesting typefaces from the last six months: Agmena (Linotype Originals), Aleksei (Fatype), Classic Grotesque (Monotype), Conspired Lovers (HaraldGeisler.com), Daphne (TypeManufactur), Gemma (Mota Italic), Irma Text Narrow (Typotheque), Lettera-Txt (Lineto.com), Lupa Sans Pro (Volcano Type/MyFonts), Macula (Bold Monday), MeM (26+), Paris Pro (Moshik Nadav Typography), Publico Banner (Commercial Type) and Worthe Numerals (House Industries).




Issue: Spring/Summer
Editor: MAGMA Brand Design
Volume: 320 pages
Format: 16 x 24 cm
Language: English/Spanish
Price: EUR 14,- (DE), CHF 25 (CH), GBP 16 (UK), $ 26 (US), EUR 16,- (others) Buy: http://www.slanted.de/shop/slanted-21-new-generation
Subscribe: http://www.slanted.de/abo 


* Slanted #21 is the bachelor thesis of Falko Gerlinghoff and Markus Lange, students at Burg Giebichenstein University of Art and Design. 



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